V 2.05: Concordia

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Broadcast Date: 8 February 2011
Director: Jesse Warn
Writer: David Rambo
Cast: Morena Baccarin, Morris Chestnut, Joel Gretsch, Mark Hildreth, Logan Huffman, Charles Mesure, Elizabeth Mitchell, Christopher Shyer, Laura Vandervoort, and Scott Wolf


© Copyright Warner Bros. Pictures

© Copyright Warner Bros. Pictures

Kyle: “If we can’t cut the head of the beast, we can at least rob it of its right hand.”

Why can’t every episode of V be like “Concordia”? This one’s got it all: a devious alien scheme taking advantage of our socio-political landscape, a suspenseful caper hatched by la Résistance, a major betrayal that’s sure to have a lasting impact on the series, intriguing new characters, and Anna looking majorly pissed at Erica for some reason. We were also presented with Tyler eating cake, but that doesn’t matter so much. Just the same, guess with which thread I’m going to start.

V Is for Vandalism without Consequence

I may have figured out what went wrong with Tyler. At first, I thought perhaps the missing components in his DNA all pertained to charisma and good sense, but now I know the problem lies in Erica refusing to guide and discipline her boy. Note to parents: do not reward your children’s bad behaviour with hugs and chocolate treats. It sends the wrong message: “What’s this? You’ve desecrated a spiritual sanctuary for your community and roughed up an old man trying to protect his home? Aw, baby, have some cake!” For crying out loud, Erica, the kid just gave you the leverage you need to keep him away from the Visitors!

Is it any wonder Tyler now sasses his mother after she wishes him happy birthday and assumes he can do whatever he wants whenever he wants? Note to teenage children: always ask your parents’ permission before agreeing to live aboard a spaceship for a month or so if only to show a modicum of gratitude for the eighteen years they spent clothing and feeding you. If they’re standing right next to you and your mother interrupted her work for this, you may want to acknowledge their existence as well.

Man, I totally would’ve gone Tiger Daddy on the brat.

V Is for Venture Capitalism of Doom

In fairness to Erica’s general disinterest in raising her child, he is a hopeless twit. Also, the woman’s got plenty on her mind, what with la Résistance and Eli Cohn teaming up to assassinate Anna at the Concordia gala. Can I just mention how much I dig the alien queen’s latest scheme? I can’t think of a better way to build landing platforms across the world without anyone noticing, and the way it plays into our global financial crisis? Brilliant. Now that’s the Anna we know and love to hate.

Our heroes also prove on top of their game this week, resolving their differences through genuine compromise and finally taking a proactive stance. If that’s the dynamic Eli Cohn brings to the table, then roll out the red carpet, and pretend you didn’t notice that mixed metaphor or the fact we’re meant to root for a terrorist all of a sudden. Anyway, with a new war criminal in town, Kyle seems to have been repositioned as a sort of liaison between Erica and Eli, an appropriate turn for the character, given his long forgotten debut as the team’s wildcard. I dig as well how he keeps suggesting they use Father Jack as bait. He just wants to get rid of the guy, doesn’t he?

Oh, and Erica’s improvised hug to give Kyle a clear shot? Awesome.

V Is for Verbal Sparring Passed Off as Journalism

It’s been a while since I dedicated a section to Chad Decker, largely because the reporter turned Résistance spy tends to just stand around waiting for something about which to raise his eyebrows in mild terror. I suspect the writers may have noticed this trend as well, which would explain their suddenly giving him a partner with whom to share talking points. Carrie strikes me as a born troublemaker and a bit of an opportunist, so I hope Chad won’t be so foolish as to trust her.

I confess the conceit plays into one of my pet peeves. Granted, point-counterpoint is presented here as “good television”, not objective journalism, and it’s an accurate depiction of the American news industry, but this rhetorical approach has all but eroded our ability to think. Consider the ongoing debate regarding capital punishment. Point-counterpoint would have you believe there are, as always, two sides to the story: the pro perspective puts justice on top, while the con position values life above all. Does this limited viewpoint really apply to struggling nations where sustaining one life in jail means letting five others on the outside starve to death? Our social topography is full of mountains and valleys, so why treat it as a flat beach? It’s a waste of free speech…

Uh, what was I writing about? Oh, yeah, Carrie’s all right. Thomas the Engineer shows promise too.

© Copyright Warner Bros. Pictures

© Copyright Warner Bros. Pictures


Bits and Pieces

  • How did they get the mega super cute baby to change her mood so fast? That’s really impressive.
  • I can’t say I’m surprised Ryan betrayed la Résistance, what with our heroes constantly reminding him that Visitors aren’t real people.
  • Mind you, I’m not convinced we saw what we think we saw: Marcus was mighty quick to take the shot, and Kyle was the one to insist they kill him as plan B. Lest we forget, the two had a little transaction going on at the end of last season.
  • Ha! Tyler said, “I love you,” first. Loser.

Quotes

Krycek is back! Let’s give him a warm welcome as well as the Alanis Morissette Award for Outstanding Misuse of a Thesaurus. He gets it. He’s Canadian:

Joe: “This missing ladder in Ty’s DNA, why would they do that?”
According to the computer screen, your boy is missing half a helix, but I’m going to assume the graphic artists screwed the pooch on that one. Mind you, you’d still be using the wrong term, seeing as a DNA ladder is actually a measurement tool.

Chad: “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts?”
Carrie: “Exactly.”
This one bugs me too. The expression warns against trusting your enemies. Since the Visitors have yet to reveal their evil intentions, its use here feels inappropriate.

Anna: “The disease is getting worse. Poor thing. Only my bliss and my bliss alone can alleviate it.”
While I’m nitpicking, you can’t use “only” in the same clause as the adverbial phrase “and my bliss alone”. It’s redundant and throws off the sentence’s whole rhythm.

Anna: “Tyler’s special.”
No comment.

Kyle: “Eli’s giving us a chance, and I’m taking it with or without you.”
Jack: “Then you mean without me too.”
Oh, nooos! But who will mess up our plans and make sanctimonious accusations every time we try to move the plot forward?

Eli: “Who the hell tipped Anna off?”
Kyle: “There were only two people who had the information and the means to alert her, or, correction, one person and one reptile. I know damn well it wasn’t Erica.”
Sweet cliffhanger.

Best episode of the season so far. Let’s hope the writers keep it up.

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Category: V, Verdict: 3.5 | Tags:

          
Editor in Chief / Movie Critic: When he started this site, Dimitri never thought he'd be writing blurbs about himself in the third person. In his other life, he works as a writer, translator, and editor for various publications in print and online. His motto is, "Have pen, will travel."